“The Finest Hours” stays afloat by a whim

Hannah Reasor, Entertainment Editor

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There is a fine line between the retelling of a story, and a story making its mark all on its own: The Finest Hours makes that mark.

The Finest Hours is the story of one of the most heroic acts in the beginning of the Coast Guard. It is the story of Bernie Webber (Chris Pine) and his men who go out to save a crew off the split ship of a T2 oil tank.

There’s a high sense of action that comes about almost immediately halfway through the film. The film put you on the edge of your seat and once you are there, you can’t sit back.

Though the action was exciting and the plot was decent, the flow of the movie lacked the quality the audience expects. Starting the movie off with Pine and Holliday Grainger (who played Pine’s onscreen wife, Miriam), the movie switched suddenly from a 1950s love story to a half-action, half-thriller rescue story.

The parallels The Finest Hours resonates between it and the 2000 adaptation of Sebastian Junger’s novel The Perfect Storm, starring actors such as George Clooney and Mark Wahlberg. The Finest Hours felt like watching a more heroic sequel to the excellent movie made prior.

At best, Pine’s acting comes across as stiff and awkward. He came through once or twice towards the end when faced with action scenes rather than in romantic or dramatic scenes where very rarely was there anything spectacular.

Casey Affleck’s performance was great as the engineer of the T2 tank, Ray Sybert. Eric Bana’s performance as Daniel Cluff, the chief of Bernie Webber at the Guard, even lacked compared to Affleck.

The film held intense scenes but they were all filled with awkward dialogue and stiff silences, sans Affleck, but it lacked the vivacity needed to truly execute such an interesting story.

Disney’s production of The Finest Hours highlighted their heroism theme well. It told a story most people may not know and told it in a way that even the youngest of children could understand and enjoy.

Audiences can go see The Finest Hours and enjoy a simplistic story about persevering even if it feels hopeless to get to the pot of gold at the end, as well as learn something that most people never knew before.

The Finest Hours comes out today, January 29. Go to Fandango.com to see times and buy tickets.

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