Featured Cowboy: Andrew Carswell

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Featured Cowboy: Andrew Carswell

Courtesy of @Illuminazyy (Twitter)

Courtesy of @Illuminazyy (Twitter)

Courtesy of @Illuminazyy (Twitter)

Michael Alpuin, Managing Editor

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For most students, public dance is an activity performed once a year at Homecoming, but for Junior Andrew Carswell it is a means to fuel his positive spirit and boost the morale of the student body.

Andrew’s story begins in third grade where he experienced harsh treatment due to his interests and hobbies.

“I was considered the weird kid in class,” said Carswell. “Most of my classmates didn’t want to be around me because I was considered ‘different.'”

After experiencing years of negativity and unfair treatment, Carswell decided to make a change in the way he views the world and his routines throughout the day. He transformed his formerly pessimistic views into the exact opposite.

“I grew to have a more positive look; negativity is a terrible feeling, but like any mood can be uplifted with a mixture of hope, smiles and friends,” said Carswell.

He has been comfortable with his extremely positive view on life and his pleasant interactions with peers since his 7th grade year when he believes his transformation to a more optimistic individual took place.

“I am passionate about how others feel and will do anything to make someone’s day just a little brighter, said Carswell.

During his sophomore year, Andrew experienced his big break, finding his niche in the school’s spirit. Carswell found himself becoming the center of attention during his lunch’s drumline performances before varsity home games after dancing for the first time at the previous year’s Military Ball.

“[It all started when] I was going to get a drink of water…I saw other students start to dance and thought back to when I had danced at the ball and everyone liked it. So i thought that if I dance in the middle of the lunchroom people might like that too, and they did,” said Carswell.

Overtime the popularity of his unconventional dancing style began to spread throughout the halls and social media applications such as Snapchat and Twitter, allowing his entertainment to reach beyond the school’s student body.

“I do not dance for fame, popularity, or anything like that,” said Carswell, “I dance for school spirit…It’s fun and uplifting for the people around me”.

With school spirit and other’s happiness at the top of his priorities, Andrew Carswell can be seen dancing all around school wherever there is music and an audience.

His general message is simple:

“It doesn’t matter who you are, what you like, or what you look like. You are special and no one can take that away from you. No matter what people say or do to you, you will not lose the one most important part of yourself: the part that makes you unique. Just be yourself, don’t change just because someone doesn’t like who you are…stay up in the clouds, shoot for your highest goals, break the expectations and always have a goal in mind,” said Carswell.

Dancing publicly is just one way in which Carswell spreads his positive outlook and kind spirit throughout the school year round. Although high school may not last forever, his friendly attitude will continue long into his future.

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